Discussion Over. Why Are You Still Talking?

Discussion Over. Why Are You Still Talking?

14th Amendment, folks. Law of the land:  AMENDMENT XIV SECTION 1. All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the state wherein they reside. No state shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any state deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.______________ No exceptions there for “unless your holy book says Read more »

Art is Terror

Art is Terror

Art is terror. It is a sublime expression of human frailty and the urge to rise beyond it, capped by the fear that we cannot. If you feel scared when pursuing your art, then you’re doing it right.  By definition, the sublime space exists outside of your comfort zone and off in the realms of the gods. 

Appendix: A Game of You (Part 3.5 of 3)

Appendix: A Game of You (Part 3.5 of 3)

As a supplement to the three-part article I’ve been posting these last few days (and as part of the original article series in newWitch magazine), I commend the following works to gamers intrigued by “real world” magical/ spiritual elements. Cited authors are the primary creators. None of the following games feature “real-life” spellwork or demand the blood of innocents. Enjoy!  Ars Magica, by Jonathan Tweet and Mark Rein•Hagen (many editions and publishers; currently Atlas Games, 2004) Armageddon, by C.J. Carella (Myrmidon Press, 1997; Eden Studios, 2003) Authentic Thaumaturgy, by Isaac Bonewits (Chaosium Games, 1978; Steve Jackson Games, 1998) Changeling: The Lost, Read more »

Gaming: From Premise to Print (Part 3 of 3)

Gaming: From Premise to Print (Part 3 of 3)

“The number one rule,” I said, “in storytelling is this: Keep your audience engaged!” It was winter 2008, and the geeky kid had become the seasoned pro, standing in front of two dozen students and teaching a course inconceivable in 1978: roleplaying game design. At the moment, RPGs are more popular – yet less profitable – than ever. Although MMORPGs(1) dominate pop culture, the book-based medium is a dying industry. High costs and low profits force even the most successful publishers to produce books at a loss. Fortunately, the independent game scene is booming. Technology (2) allows anyone with a computer, some software and Read more »

Gaming: Serious Fun (Part 2 of 3)

Gaming: Serious Fun (Part 2 of 3)

“It’s all yours. We don’t have the slightest idea what to do with it.” So spoke Ken Cliffe, my boss at White Wolf Game Studio, as he handed me the advance copy of Mage: The Ascension, first edition. This was 1993, and my introduction to game design. From summer ’93 until winter ’98, I helmed this purple-cloaked beast. Since then, I’ve managed other game lines, notably Mage: The Sorcerers Crusade and Deliria: Faerie Tales for a New Millennium. In that time, I’ve journeyed from part-time Pagan gamer to full-time Pagan author, learning volumes about magic, gaming, publishing and myself. I could fill a book Read more »

Gaming: The Magic Avatar (Part 1 of 3)

Gaming: The Magic Avatar (Part 1 of 3)

It began with little soldiers and bright books in a shopping mall. I was 14 and hated life. Smart, reclusive and what would later be called dyslexic, I was living with my dad in Springfield, VA. My family had just split, and I spent my after-school days wandering around town or holed up in a tiny room painting models and listening to classic rock. (1) I had few friends, and they all lived near Mom. At the cusp of adolescence, I had no idea who I was, only that I was miserable. And then, while looking for new model kits, Read more »